There is no mercy for dealing with mental illnesses.

There is no mercy for dealing with mental illnesses.

The National Health Institute RBC states that in Rwanda there is no mercy when it comes to treating and calling for people with mental illnesses. It emphasizes that there are advancements in treating these illnesses, including therapies and necessary medications that help the affected individuals.

kwamamaza

 

Depression, commonly known as a mental illness, is a condition many people struggle with due to various factors that affect them differently, either by experiencing traumatic events or by genetic predisposition.

Some citizens interviewed by ISANGO Star have shown that this illness is recognizable and persistent. Some of them mention that its onset varies for different reasons, as they continue to explain.

One says: "Depression is unpredictable, sometimes it's present when you least expect it. It's influenced by personal circumstances and lifestyle."

Another says: "Depression is real. I live with it, and I feel like I'm alone. I don't want to talk to anyone, I feel like everyone has abandoned me."

"You can be in a thriving business, but it can take a downturn. It affects everything you've started, including the depression you've been experiencing."

Research from the World Health Organization (WHO) conducted in 2012 showed that every day, globally, people are affected by depression, with projections indicating an increase in cases by 2030, which will be among the leading causes of disability worldwide.

This report indicates that there is a challenge in the health systems of all countries, especially in the development path, as it has a significant impact on people with depression who are not given the necessary care.

However, concerning the issue in Rwanda, the National Health Institute, RBC, states that they are not relenting in combating this illness because they have all the means to treat it whenever individuals are affected by it.

Dr. Iyamuremye J. Damascene, head of the mental health department, said: "In Rwanda, although it is a prevalent illness, it is difficult to treat. Therefore, there is no mercy because we have dedicated professionals who work on treating mental health issues, including depression, and we have therapies and medications."

Dr. Iyamuremye stresses that people should not shy away from seeking help, saying, "The meeting is how quickly you seek help because this illness is urgent."

A study conducted by the National Institute of Health (RBC) in 2018 showed that 11.9% of Rwandans suffer from depression, while 35% of survivors of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi also suffer from this illness. At present, one in five individuals between the ages of 14 and 18 experiences mental health problems at a rate of 10%.

Written by Kavukire Alexis

 

kwamamaza

There is no mercy for dealing with mental illnesses.

There is no mercy for dealing with mental illnesses.

 Feb 23, 2024 - 13:42

The National Health Institute RBC states that in Rwanda there is no mercy when it comes to treating and calling for people with mental illnesses. It emphasizes that there are advancements in treating these illnesses, including therapies and necessary medications that help the affected individuals.

kwamamaza

Depression, commonly known as a mental illness, is a condition many people struggle with due to various factors that affect them differently, either by experiencing traumatic events or by genetic predisposition.

Some citizens interviewed by ISANGO Star have shown that this illness is recognizable and persistent. Some of them mention that its onset varies for different reasons, as they continue to explain.

One says: "Depression is unpredictable, sometimes it's present when you least expect it. It's influenced by personal circumstances and lifestyle."

Another says: "Depression is real. I live with it, and I feel like I'm alone. I don't want to talk to anyone, I feel like everyone has abandoned me."

"You can be in a thriving business, but it can take a downturn. It affects everything you've started, including the depression you've been experiencing."

Research from the World Health Organization (WHO) conducted in 2012 showed that every day, globally, people are affected by depression, with projections indicating an increase in cases by 2030, which will be among the leading causes of disability worldwide.

This report indicates that there is a challenge in the health systems of all countries, especially in the development path, as it has a significant impact on people with depression who are not given the necessary care.

However, concerning the issue in Rwanda, the National Health Institute, RBC, states that they are not relenting in combating this illness because they have all the means to treat it whenever individuals are affected by it.

Dr. Iyamuremye J. Damascene, head of the mental health department, said: "In Rwanda, although it is a prevalent illness, it is difficult to treat. Therefore, there is no mercy because we have dedicated professionals who work on treating mental health issues, including depression, and we have therapies and medications."

Dr. Iyamuremye stresses that people should not shy away from seeking help, saying, "The meeting is how quickly you seek help because this illness is urgent."

A study conducted by the National Institute of Health (RBC) in 2018 showed that 11.9% of Rwandans suffer from depression, while 35% of survivors of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi also suffer from this illness. At present, one in five individuals between the ages of 14 and 18 experiences mental health problems at a rate of 10%.

Written by Kavukire Alexis

kwamamaza