The Hemophilia Disease Troubling Health Institutions in Rwanda

The Hemophilia Disease Troubling Health Institutions in Rwanda

Health institutions in Rwanda emphasize that Rwandans need to be aware that hemophilia is a rare genetic disorder.

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It is a disease caused by the inability of blood to clot when a person is injured undergoes surgery, or is injured in some way, and there are times when a person is born with it.
MURINDABYUMA Sylvestre, a spokesperson for the Hemophilia Patients and Families Association in Rwanda, explains "Hemophilia is a disease where a person has blood in their body that does not clot when injured, even though they have the necessary elements or are in front of them. Clotting is the process of blood coagulation." 
He adds that when it presents significant symptoms, including bleeding, immediate medical attention is required to stop the bleeding.
Murindabyuma continues, "These symptoms may include a person being unable to stop bleeding, generally within 5 minutes, after which blood loss can occur, and if left unchecked, within 10 minutes, bleeding may intensify. When a person experiences this, they should be taken to a doctor who can diagnose the cause and refer them to the appropriate treatment center, usually a large hospital like CHUK, where they can be tested for blood and diagnosed with a disorder or not."
He goes on to say, "Other symptoms include people who experience frequent nosebleeds or experience excessive bruising, indicating a problem with blood clotting, and sometimes there are those who bleed profusely, which may be a sign as well."
While some affected and their families are aware, they are encouraged by health experts to seek medical attention as soon as possible.
One affected individual said, "My eldest child used to bleed a lot to the point where we wondered if it was a curse placed upon him, but as I grew to understand, I realized there was no fault in him. After consulting at CHUK, they found out I also have hemophilia, so they sent my children for testing, and all of them were found to have it."
Another said, "At the time, it was unimaginable; later, when we went to the hospital, they told us about the advances they were making, and that's when we began to see changes."
Although challenging, health institutions in Rwanda announce that efforts are being made to increase awareness and access to treatment both nationally and locally to ensure people are informed and treated. At the government level, to improve access to treatment, hemophilia patients receive subsidies totalling 2 million Rwandan francs, covering up to 6 doses of the necessary medication.

 

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The Hemophilia Disease Troubling Health Institutions in Rwanda

The Hemophilia Disease Troubling Health Institutions in Rwanda

 Feb 24, 2024 - 14:07

Health institutions in Rwanda emphasize that Rwandans need to be aware that hemophilia is a rare genetic disorder.

kwamamaza

It is a disease caused by the inability of blood to clot when a person is injured undergoes surgery, or is injured in some way, and there are times when a person is born with it.
MURINDABYUMA Sylvestre, a spokesperson for the Hemophilia Patients and Families Association in Rwanda, explains "Hemophilia is a disease where a person has blood in their body that does not clot when injured, even though they have the necessary elements or are in front of them. Clotting is the process of blood coagulation." 
He adds that when it presents significant symptoms, including bleeding, immediate medical attention is required to stop the bleeding.
Murindabyuma continues, "These symptoms may include a person being unable to stop bleeding, generally within 5 minutes, after which blood loss can occur, and if left unchecked, within 10 minutes, bleeding may intensify. When a person experiences this, they should be taken to a doctor who can diagnose the cause and refer them to the appropriate treatment center, usually a large hospital like CHUK, where they can be tested for blood and diagnosed with a disorder or not."
He goes on to say, "Other symptoms include people who experience frequent nosebleeds or experience excessive bruising, indicating a problem with blood clotting, and sometimes there are those who bleed profusely, which may be a sign as well."
While some affected and their families are aware, they are encouraged by health experts to seek medical attention as soon as possible.
One affected individual said, "My eldest child used to bleed a lot to the point where we wondered if it was a curse placed upon him, but as I grew to understand, I realized there was no fault in him. After consulting at CHUK, they found out I also have hemophilia, so they sent my children for testing, and all of them were found to have it."
Another said, "At the time, it was unimaginable; later, when we went to the hospital, they told us about the advances they were making, and that's when we began to see changes."
Although challenging, health institutions in Rwanda announce that efforts are being made to increase awareness and access to treatment both nationally and locally to ensure people are informed and treated. At the government level, to improve access to treatment, hemophilia patients receive subsidies totalling 2 million Rwandan francs, covering up to 6 doses of the necessary medication.

kwamamaza