In the year 2030, Rwanda will have significantly reduced the deaths of parents and children

In the year 2030, Rwanda will have significantly reduced the deaths of parents and children

Some experts say the government's goal of reducing parental and child deaths to 70/100,000 by 2030 will be achieved. However, they note that the number of deaths is still high among parents and children who do not seek medical attention when they go to the hospital. At the same time, parents at this stage say that deaths are increasing significantly because they cannot be treated at home.

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Rwanda is among the African countries that have achieved the Millennium Development Goals, where it has succeeded in reducing the child mortality rate to five years. In its continued progress, Rwanda has strengthened its efforts to reduce parental deaths to three times and child deaths to twice. Women have been seeking reproductive health services at the Rugarama Health Center in Nyarugenge District, emphasizing that reducing deaths is not a matter of health professionals alone but also of community involvement. 

In an interview with ISANGO Star, one person said: "Things have changed now because when we go to the hospital they urge us to tell others who are afraid to come. Then the doctors will follow up. I think no parent wants to die at home; it's an old tradition that has ended." "There are no deaths because someone goes to the health center. Right now, I went for the first time on the first date and reached the last minute without any problems."

Another said: "Because they used to die at home, children were left behind, and parents also died. But now they are following up, so there is no problem."

The high number of deaths can also be seen as a potential indicator of child mortality because, in 2020, the number of parents who died reached 2,340.

Beatrice UWAMAHORO, a nurse at Rugarama Health Center, says that for the Ministry of Health to achieve this goal, they need to increase staff.

"We are understaffed at the health center. You can see the workload of the nurses... now in a day, I can see up to 50 patients. You start by giving good service to everyone, then by the time you reach 40... there is always a time when we can't handle it. We ask them to see how they can increase staff."

Sibomana Hassan, Head of the Maternal and Child Health Department at the National Health Institute, RBC, says there are many challenges in ensuring the health of the child and parent. He added that there is still a long way to go.

"We have a big journey ahead of us because we want to achieve a target of fewer than 70/100,000 parents with living children. Then the children also have to survive. It is the Ministry of Health's goal because the country does not want to move forward and endanger many children. A child who is born without hope, and a parent calls it a curse and says I will not have another one."

"But as you have seen, in other surveys that have been conducted, or in the research that has been done, the hope of survival among Rwandans has started to emerge. We are close to reaching 70 years."

"Moreover, there are essential things, the way we move forward in difficult times so that we can reach there, and when you see it, everything is related to these deaths we are talking about. If you can stop child deaths, you add hope to the population."

Rwanda aims to continue reducing parental and child deaths to 70 per 100,000 parents by 2030, down from 203 per 100,000 parents, and child deaths under the age of 5 are now at 45.

All of this shows that up to now, 96% of children under two years of age have been vaccinated, while 99% of women are tested at least once. At the same time, 93% seek medical attention.

This is why Rwanda is ranked 9th in ensuring that its citizens have the highest hope of living in Africa because the average life expectancy of Rwandans has risen from 67 to 69 years between 2021.

Written by Kavukire Alexis 

 

kwamamaza

In the year 2030, Rwanda will have significantly reduced the deaths of parents and children

In the year 2030, Rwanda will have significantly reduced the deaths of parents and children

 Feb 23, 2024 - 14:35

Some experts say the government's goal of reducing parental and child deaths to 70/100,000 by 2030 will be achieved. However, they note that the number of deaths is still high among parents and children who do not seek medical attention when they go to the hospital. At the same time, parents at this stage say that deaths are increasing significantly because they cannot be treated at home.

kwamamaza

Rwanda is among the African countries that have achieved the Millennium Development Goals, where it has succeeded in reducing the child mortality rate to five years. In its continued progress, Rwanda has strengthened its efforts to reduce parental deaths to three times and child deaths to twice. Women have been seeking reproductive health services at the Rugarama Health Center in Nyarugenge District, emphasizing that reducing deaths is not a matter of health professionals alone but also of community involvement. 

In an interview with ISANGO Star, one person said: "Things have changed now because when we go to the hospital they urge us to tell others who are afraid to come. Then the doctors will follow up. I think no parent wants to die at home; it's an old tradition that has ended." "There are no deaths because someone goes to the health center. Right now, I went for the first time on the first date and reached the last minute without any problems."

Another said: "Because they used to die at home, children were left behind, and parents also died. But now they are following up, so there is no problem."

The high number of deaths can also be seen as a potential indicator of child mortality because, in 2020, the number of parents who died reached 2,340.

Beatrice UWAMAHORO, a nurse at Rugarama Health Center, says that for the Ministry of Health to achieve this goal, they need to increase staff.

"We are understaffed at the health center. You can see the workload of the nurses... now in a day, I can see up to 50 patients. You start by giving good service to everyone, then by the time you reach 40... there is always a time when we can't handle it. We ask them to see how they can increase staff."

Sibomana Hassan, Head of the Maternal and Child Health Department at the National Health Institute, RBC, says there are many challenges in ensuring the health of the child and parent. He added that there is still a long way to go.

"We have a big journey ahead of us because we want to achieve a target of fewer than 70/100,000 parents with living children. Then the children also have to survive. It is the Ministry of Health's goal because the country does not want to move forward and endanger many children. A child who is born without hope, and a parent calls it a curse and says I will not have another one."

"But as you have seen, in other surveys that have been conducted, or in the research that has been done, the hope of survival among Rwandans has started to emerge. We are close to reaching 70 years."

"Moreover, there are essential things, the way we move forward in difficult times so that we can reach there, and when you see it, everything is related to these deaths we are talking about. If you can stop child deaths, you add hope to the population."

Rwanda aims to continue reducing parental and child deaths to 70 per 100,000 parents by 2030, down from 203 per 100,000 parents, and child deaths under the age of 5 are now at 45.

All of this shows that up to now, 96% of children under two years of age have been vaccinated, while 99% of women are tested at least once. At the same time, 93% seek medical attention.

This is why Rwanda is ranked 9th in ensuring that its citizens have the highest hope of living in Africa because the average life expectancy of Rwandans has risen from 67 to 69 years between 2021.

Written by Kavukire Alexis 

kwamamaza